Sunday, 11 October 2015

Nepal - you asked for photos!

And photos you shall have. (The post I'd planned, with ideas for those who are more adventurous than I, can wait till next week.)

But there will be no photos of the earthquake. No photos of fallen-down temples nor fallen down houses nor the temporary shelters that have contained families during the monsoon. I've seen them, and yes, I have photos. But I refuse to join in the catastrophising of Nepal and insist on celebrating all things wonderful.

To prove that most of Kathmandu is still standing: here is a view from the rooftop of the hotel I stayed in during my first couple of days in the city:


I went to markets. I love markets, the noise and the smell and the general mayhem of them. Buying a packet of beans in our sterile supermarkets can't compare with scooping them out of sacks like these:



Away from the pandemonium of Kathmandu, I spent some time in Bandipur. It's a quiet hill station, beautifully restored. The intrepid can go paragliding from here (jumping off a mountains strapped to a parachute). Those who have a fit of the heeby-jeebies at the mere thought of it can sit in one of the lovely cafes here and watch the world go by.



Back in Pokhara, I did a lot of sitting by the lake and watching the world go by. These boats, of course, should have been full of tourists. I did my bit - not that I rowed. I let someone else to the rowing, and simply relished the quiet of the water and looming green of the hills.



I know I gave you Annapurna South in my last post - and here is it again. This picture was taken soon after six in the morning. I sat on my balcony, watching the mountains wake up, with the snow sparkling and the birds singing. (I know there are many who see the dawn every day. For me, it is an event.)



In contrast, a sunset, over the river in Chitwan.



Rhinos - again at Chitwan. And yes, they are roaming free, and I was on an elephant. (They have been known to rampage through the village - or so I was told. But maybe that's just a tale to excite the tourists. I've certainly had one-too-many close encounters with animals in the wild to risk a jungle walk.)



And finally - prayer flags, flying high over rooftops in Kathmandu. Nepal needs her gods to look kindly on her now.


10 comments:

  1. Just breathtaking pics, Jo. What a fascinating and beautiful country

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is stunningly beautiful, Carol!

      Delete
  2. Jo, it looks very beautiful indeed. I would love to go rowing in one of those boats and sit in one of those very pretty cafés. I'm also amazed the rhino are just wandering free and are not being protected as they have to be everywhere else. I could imagine having a wonderful time there, so I hope the tourists return in lucrative numbers!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The rhinos are in a national park - so up to a point they are protected. But they wander about where they will, so it's fab to see them.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. It is, indeed, stunningly beautiful!

      Delete
  4. Oh, wonderful! I love the boats at Pokhara, and Annapurna... and all of them. Thanks for posting them x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those boats are lovely, aren't they. And Annapurna is just majestic!

      Delete
  5. What I like about your photos is that they express the various facets of this country.

    Greetings from London.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Well chosen photos to give a real feeling of the place. I've always wanted to go to a hill station, it's just the idea of one really that appeals to me, whatever it is actually like :) I am sure that seeing the mountains in the early sun is like a dream.

    ReplyDelete